Monthly Archives: September 2013

Where are You and Why Aren’t You Here?

This past Shabbos Rabbi Menachem Leibtag gave the Sicha in Gush.  He made a fascinating textual point about last week’s Parsha.  

When God seeks Adam in Gan Eden after the sin, he asks “איכה”.   Continue reading Where are You and Why Aren’t You Here?

Advertisements

Sukkah and Bechol Derachecha Daehu

A few days ago, a cousin of Ora’s asked me about a very strange Gemara in Avodah Zara 3a:

תלמוד בבלי מסכת עבודה זרה דף ג עמוד א -ב

 אמרו לפניו: רבש”ע, תנה לנו מראש ונעשנה, אמר להן הקב”ה שוטים שבעולם, מי שטרח בערב שבת יאכל בשבת, מי שלא טרח בערב שבת מהיכן יאכל בשבת? אלא אף על פי כן, מצוה קלה יש לי וסוכה שמה, לכו ועשו אותה. ומי מצית אמרת הכי? והא אמר רבי יהושע בן לוי, מאי דכתיב: +דברים ז+ אשר אנכי מצוך היום? היום לעשותם – ולא למחר לעשותם, היום לעשותם – ולא היום ליטול שכר! אלא, שאין הקב”ה בא בטרוניא עם בריותיו. ואמאי קרי ליה מצוה קלה? משום דלית ביה חסרון כיס. מיד כל אחד [ואחד] נוטל והולך ועושה סוכה בראש גגו, והקדוש ברוך הוא מקדיר עליהם חמה בתקופת תמוז, וכל אחד ואחד מבעט בסוכתו ויוצא, שנאמר: +תהלים ב+ ננתקה את מוסרותימו ונשליכה ממנו עבותימו. מקדיר, והא אמרת: אין הקדוש ברוך הוא בא בטרוניא עם בריותיו! משום דישראל נמי זימני

דמשכא להו תקופת תמוז עד חגא והוי להו צערא. והאמר רבא: מצטער פטור מן הסוכה! נהי דפטור, בעוטי מי מבעטי. מיד, הקב”ה יושב ומשחק עליהן, שנאמר: +תהלים ב+ יושב בשמים ישחק וגו’

 

The Gemara discusses the end of days, when the nations of the world will challenge God for unfairly rewarding the Jews.  When God tells them that they are rewarded for doing the mitzvot, they ask to be given the same chance.  After raising some objections, God offers them one mitzvah, an easy mitzvah:  sukkah.  They all go to build a sukkah.  Once they are in, God makes the sun blast full force, making it sweltering hot.  In disgust, the nations of the world kick their sukkot and leave.  At this God laughs – he has proven his point.  The Jews deserve the reward and the nations do not.  During this discussion, however, the Gemara notes that if it was really sweltering, one is not obligated to be in the sukkah – its mitzaer.  The Gemara responds that while the heat can provide an exemption, the Jews would have left without kicking the sukkah, thus distinguishing themselves from the nations of the world. 

 

Why of all mitzvot, is sukkah chosen?  I am sure many people ask this question and suggest answers.  I believe there is a passage in Pachad Yitzchak about it that R. Yitzchak Blau discusses on the VBM.  However, I wanted to run by what I suggested off the cuff in an alleyway in Meah Shearim. 

Sukkah, more than any other mitzvah, celebrates the possibility of the everyday having religious significance.  Whether one thinks that “teshvu k’ein taduru obligates a series of “living like acts”, or more likely, it requires you to “live everyday life” in the sukkah – the actions that become religiously significant are particularly mundane.  Eating, sleeping, schmoozing all become mitzvot.  According to Rambam (against Rabbenu Tam), one makes a bracha for simply walking into the sukkah.  More amazingly, as the Gemara here notes, if one is uncomfortable in the sukkah, he can leave, as one would not live that way. 

In short, sukkah allows us to recognize the possibility of bechol derachecha daehu – in all your ways know Him.  In a sense, that is less demanding that ritual mitzvot, but in a sense it is more.  There is no escape from Avodat Hashem.  Even the everyday must be understood as part avodat Hashem.  I would suggest that it was this perspective the Gemara assumes is particularly Jewish, rather than pagan.  Avodat Hashem is not primarily about ritual, while paganism is. 

I would suggest that this is what is highlighted by the mitzaer comment- Jews would leave when it is hot, recognizing that Hashem set up this mitzvah to be particularly human, and embrace the mitzvah, both its rules and exception. However, from the perspective a ritualistic religion, this exemption makes no sense.  Thus, the pagans could only view sukkah as their one ritual mitzvah, and when they are discouraged, they leave in disgust.  The possibility that God wants mitzvot to be human would not enter their minds.  To leave and recognize that sometimes one can serve God by recognizing human limits and remaining passive would not have entered their minds. 

This, I think connects to an earlier passage in that same Gemara.  The nations try to get rewarded for having built bridges and other infrastructure that allowed the Jews to learn Torah.  God responds that they built all of those things for themselves.  The implication, however, is that if they had built them for the sake of avodat Hashem, they would have been rewarded.  However, the Gemara’s vision is that pagans do not understand how everyday life can be spiritually meaningful, so they don’t build society for religious reasons.  They can’t celebrate sukkah.  They want religion to be about specific rituals which they do and get rewarded for.  [For another post, I think this is why only Jews can bring shelamim, while anyone can bring olot.  Vein Kan Makom LeHaarich.]

Anyways, if there are other thoughts, let me know.  In the meantime, Chag Sameach.  

Sukkah and Bechol Derachecha Daehu

A few days ago, a cousin of Ora’s asked me about a very strange Gemara in Avodah Zara 3a:

תלמוד בבלי מסכת עבודה זרה דף ג עמוד א -ב

 אמרו לפניו: רבש”ע, תנה לנו מראש ונעשנה, אמר להן הקב”ה שוטים שבעולם, מי שטרח בערב שבת יאכל בשבת, מי שלא טרח בערב שבת מהיכן יאכל בשבת? אלא אף על פי כן, מצוה קלה יש לי וסוכה שמה, לכו ועשו אותה. ומי מצית אמרת הכי? והא אמר רבי יהושע בן לוי, מאי דכתיב: +דברים ז+ אשר אנכי מצוך היום? היום לעשותם – ולא למחר לעשותם, היום לעשותם – ולא היום ליטול שכר! אלא, שאין הקב”ה בא בטרוניא עם בריותיו. ואמאי קרי ליה מצוה קלה? משום דלית ביה חסרון כיס. מיד כל אחד [ואחד] נוטל והולך ועושה סוכה בראש גגו, והקדוש ברוך הוא מקדיר עליהם חמה בתקופת תמוז, וכל אחד ואחד מבעט בסוכתו ויוצא, שנאמר: +תהלים ב+ ננתקה את מוסרותימו ונשליכה ממנו עבותימו. מקדיר, והא אמרת: אין הקדוש ברוך הוא בא בטרוניא עם בריותיו! משום דישראל נמי זימני

דמשכא להו תקופת תמוז עד חגא והוי להו צערא. והאמר רבא: מצטער פטור מן הסוכה! נהי דפטור, בעוטי מי מבעטי. מיד, הקב”ה יושב ומשחק עליהן, שנאמר: +תהלים ב+ יושב בשמים ישחק וגו’

 

The Gemara discusses the end of days, when the nations of the world will challenge God for unfairly rewarding the Jews.  When God tells them that they are rewarded for doing the mitzvot, they ask to be given the same chance.  After raising some objections, God offers them one mitzvah, an easy mitzvah:  sukkah.  They all go to build a sukkah.  Once they are in, God makes the sun blast full force, making it sweltering hot.  In disgust, the nations of the world kick their sukkot and leave.  At this God laughs – he has proven his point.  The Jews deserve the reward and the nations do not.  During this discussion, however, the Gemara notes that if it was really sweltering, one is not obligated to be in the sukkah – its mitzaer.  The Gemara responds that while the heat can provide an exemption, the Jews would have left without kicking the sukkah, thus distinguishing themselves from the nations of the world. 

 

Why of all mitzvot, is sukkah chosen?  I am sure many people ask this question and suggest answers.  I believe there is a passage in Pachad Yitzchak about it that R. Yitzchak Blau discusses on the VBM.  However, I wanted to run by what I suggested off the cuff in an alleyway in Meah Shearim. 

Sukkah, more than any other mitzvah, celebrates the possibility of the everyday having religious significance.  Whether one thinks that “teshvu k’ein taduru obligates a series of “living like acts”, or more likely, it requires you to “live everyday life” in the sukkah – the actions that become religiously significant are particularly mundane.  Eating, sleeping, schmoozing all become mitzvot.  According to Rambam (against Rabbenu Tam), one makes a bracha for simply walking into the sukkah.  More amazingly, as the Gemara here notes, if one is uncomfortable in the sukkah, he can leave, as one would not live that way. 

In short, sukkah allows us to recognize the possibility of bechol derachecha daehu – in all your ways know Him.  In a sense, that is less demanding that ritual mitzvot, but in a sense it is more.  There is no escape from Avodat Hashem.  Even the everyday must be understood as part avodat Hashem.  I would suggest that it was this perspective the Gemara assumes is particularly Jewish, rather than pagan.  Avodat Hashem is not primarily about ritual, while paganism is. 

I would suggest that this is what is highlighted by the mitzaer comment- Jews would leave when it is hot, recognizing that Hashem set up this mitzvah to be particularly human, and embrace the mitzvah, both its rules and exception. However, from the perspective a ritualistic religion, this exemption makes no sense.  Thus, the pagans could only view sukkah as their one ritual mitzvah, and when they are discouraged, they leave in disgust.  The possibility that God wants mitzvot to be human would not enter their minds.  To leave and recognize that sometimes one can serve God by recognizing human limits and remaining passive would not have entered their minds. 

This, I think connects to an earlier passage in that same Gemara.  The nations try to get rewarded for having built bridges and other infrastructure that allowed the Jews to learn Torah.  God responds that they built all of those things for themselves.  The implication, however, is that if they had built them for the sake of avodat Hashem, they would have been rewarded.  However, the Gemara’s vision is that pagans do not understand how everyday life can be spiritually meaningful, so they don’t build society for religious reasons.  They can’t celebrate sukkah.  They want religion to be about specific rituals which they do and get rewarded for.  [For another post, I think this is why only Jews can bring shelamim, while anyone can bring olot.  Vein Kan Makom LeHaarich.]

Anyways, if there are other thoughts, let me know.  In the meantime, Chag Sameach.  

Erev Yom Kippur Apologies

For years, I was bothered by the insincerity of Erev Yom Kippur apologies – people go over to their friends who they likely did not egregiously offend, and ask them for mechila.  If they are really frum, they wait for a formal “I am mochel you,” and don’t suffice with a “don’t worry about it” or a nod of the head and waiving of the hand.  What’s the point?  Shouldn’t Erev Yom Kippur be about approaching those who it is hard to apologize to, those who you really hurt, and those who you are ashamed to face?

While I still think this is true at some level, a perspective from the German Baalei Tosafot put a spin on Erev Yom Kippur that makes these seemingly flippant apologies meaningful.  This position was first pointed out to me by Itamar Rosensweig in the Or Zarua, but I have since seen that it is found in many German Tosafot, such as the Mordechai and Rosh at the end of Yoma.

These Rishonim argue that one of the central motifs of Yom Kippur (based on Pirkei D’Rebbe Elazar) is that we try to be like angels.  For this reason we don’t eat, drink, we stand, etc.  What is unexpected is the claim that angels have peace among them, so to be angelic we need to have peace among us.  From this perspective, it is undeniable that the half-hearted/well-meaning apologies do create a sense of good will.  Even with our friends, we have minor disagreements, tensions, and grudges.  When Erev Yom Kippur comes, we are ready to forgive and forget.  Together we seek forgiveness and a relationship with Hashem, as individuals and as a community.  R. Rosensweig notes that Yom Kippur is not a yearly experience, but each Yom Kippur is a once in a lifetime opportunity – hence the Kohen Gadol cannot reuse the clothes he wears on Yom Kippur.  To experience that fully, as humans and as angels, we need to get along.

One of the hardest parts of this past year and making aliyah, is that so many friends are no longer around, at least not on a daily basis.  Yom Kippur in YU was always moving, so much because of the people I knew were around me, even if for most of Yom Kippur my Tallis blocked them from sight.  As it is now Erev Yom Kippur in Eretz Yisrael, and will be in America in a few short hours, I ask mechila from all my friends, whether I did anything or not.  In that spirit, despite the thousands of miles that separate us, we will all enter Yom Kippur together.  Gemar Chatimah Tova.

ספר אור זרוע ח”ב – הלכות יום הכיפורים סימן רעז

[א] ערב יום הכפורי’ מנהג לטבול ולבקש מחילה כל מי שחטא לחבירו כדאשכחן ברב דאזל לגבי ההוא טבחא במעלי יומא דכפורי וגבי ר’ חנינא תריסר מעלי יומא דכיפורי והראיה שטובלין מדאמר במדרש ר’ תנחומא סוף פרשת ואתחנן שמע ישראל וגו’ רבנין אמרי אבל ביוה”כ שהן נקיים כמלאכים אומרים אותו בפרהסיא ואמרי’ בפדר”א בפרק מ”ו ראה סמאל שלא מצא חטא בישראל ביוה”כ ואמר לפני הקב”ה רבש”ע יש לך עם אחד בארץ כמלאכי השרת מה מלאכי השרת יחופי רגל אף ישראל כן ביוה”כ מה מלאכי השרת אין להם קפצין אף ישראל כן עומדים על רגליהם ביוה”כ מה מה”ש אינם אוכלים ושותים אף ישראל כן ביוה”כ מה מה”ש נקיים כך ישראל נקיים מכל חטא ביוה”כ מה מה”ש שלום ביניהם כך ישראל שלום ביניה’ ביוה”כ והקב”ה שומע עדות מפי קטיגור שלהם ומכפר על המזבח ועל המקדש ועל הכהנים ועל כל הקהל מקטן ועד גדול. ומדקאמר שישראל נקיים דהיינו שטבלו [ש”מ] שכן מנהג בישראל לטבול בעיוה”כ ומיכן כמו כן סמך לאותן שעומדים ביוה”כ כל היום ומדקאמר שיש לישראל שלום ביניהם ביוה”כ ש”מ שכך הוא רגילות ומנהג ביוה”כ לכל מי שחטא לחבירו שמבקש ממנו מחילה בעיוה”כ ויהיה כל יוה”כ שלום ביניהם דומיא דמלאכי השרת.

Children of God?

One common trope throughout Yamim Noraim davening is that the Jews have different types of relationships with Hashem – that of children and that of sons.  I want to focus on an interesting machloket about the circumstances under which we are considered sons. 

The Gemara in Kiddushin records a dispute:

תלמוד בבלי מסכת קידושין דף לו עמוד א

בנים אתם לה’ אלהיכם, בזמן שאתם נוהגים מנהג בנים – אתם קרוים בנים, אין אתם נוהגים מנהג בנים – אין אתם קרוים בנים, דברי ר’ יהודה; רבי מאיר אומר: בין כך ובין כך אתם קרוים בנים, שנאמר: +ירמיה ד+ בנים סכלים המה, ואומר: +דברים לב+ בנים לא אמון בם, ואומר: +ישעיהו א+ זרע מרעים בנים משחיתים, ואומר: +הושע ב+ והיה במקום אשר יאמר להם לא עמי אתם יאמר להם בני אל חי. מאי ואומר? וכי תימא, סכלי הוא דמקרי בני, כי לית בהו הימנותייהו לא מיקרו בני, ת”ש, ואומר: בנים לא אמון בם; וכי תימא, כי לית בהו הימנותא הוא דמיקרו בנים, כי פלחו לעבודת כוכבים לא מיקרו בנים, ת”ש, ואומר: זרע מרעים בנים משחיתים; וכ”ת, בנים משחיתים הוא דמיקרו, בני מעלייא לא מיקרו, ת”ש, ואומר: והיה במקום אשר יאמר להם לא עמי אתם יאמר להם בני אל חי.

 

R. Yehuda believes that we are only considered Hashem’s children if we follow “the ways of his children” – meaning we do what we are supposed to.  R. Meir believes that we are considered children whether we follow the Torah or not.  What lies behind this machloket?  Continue reading Children of God?